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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Lucky Wild Boars (Pigs) at Indian Temple in Taiping a new tourist attraction

FEELING WANNA TO VISIT AND GET TO KNOW MORE
FOR BOOKING PLEASE CALL INOVASI TOUR & TRAVEL
Rajan (60196504595) or Sara (60123611880)
sarapandian@gmail.com / veeratap@gmail.com
For more details on trip




Photos and Story about the Temple



Touching the wild boars for good luck:
Big crowd of visitors waiting behind the wooden barricade erected at the temple area for the wild boars to turn up.

Waiting patiently. Everyone comes to the temple for good luck. The white building on the left in the background is the Om Sakthi Sri Jada Muneesvarar Alayam Indian temple. The temple has gained the name Lucky Wild Boar Temple because the wild boars have brought good luck to people who touched them and seek their blessings.
The wild boars turn up from the secondary jungle in the hills.


Only two boars for now... but don't despair as more will come soon.
More wild boars turn up at the barricade area to the excitement of the crowd.
The crowd stretching out their hands through the wooden barricade to feed and touch the wild boars.
Pushing and shoving to get near the boar.
Some visitors have numbers written on pieces of paper and rub them against the boar.
As darkness falls, more wild boars turn up when they hear the sounds of the temple bell which is rung in the evening about 7.00 pm.
The wild boars do not move away with the excitement caused by the crowd of visitors.
The loud noises and hand movements from the crowd do not frighten the wild boars which seems to like the attention given.
The visitors just want to feed and touch the wild boars for good luck.


A visitor feeding a wild boar with rice provided by the temple.


The wild boars allow visitors to touch them.
Some lucky visitors managed to rub ringgit notes against the boars.
Getting close to the wild boars with bare hands.

These two women happily touching the wild boars with bare hands for good luck.


Visitors giving the boar a stroke on its bristly body.
Visitors hand-feeding the wild boars.
Visitors rubbing four-digit number on the boar’s body to have better chances to strike it big.




Prayer at the holy temple:


Long queue of devotees waiting in line to offer prayer to Lord Muneesvarar, also known as the God of Warrior.
Devotees offer prayer with lighted joss-sticks, lotus-shaped candles and flowers.
A stall in the temple compound selling flowers and prayer items.
Crowd of devotees and visitors mingling around. The white building on the left in the background is the Om Sakthi Sri Jada Muneesvarar Alayam temple.
The night scene at the temple compound with bigger crowd of devotees and visitors.
The Om Sakthi Sri Jada Muneesvarar Alayam Indian temple located at the foothill behind Tesco Taiping hypermarket in Kamunting, Taiping, Perak is drawing big crowd of visitors and tourists daily since words spread that many had struck rich winning four-digit numbers (lottery) after touching or stroking the wild boars that turned up at the temple grounds from the secondary jungle in the hills to feed on rice food prepared by temple volunteers.

The temple has gained the name Lucky Wild Boar Temple because the wild boars have brought good luck to people who touched them and seek their blessings.

The main deity at the Om Sakthi Sri Jada Muneesvarar Alayam temple is Lord Muneesvarar also known as the God of Warrior who rides a horse. It is said that the wild boars at the temple belonged to Lord Muneesvarar. Protected by Lord Muneesvarar, the wild boars are said to have special powers to bring good luck to those who seek its blessings. Strangely the wild boars do not look aggressive and allow visitors to caress or stroke its bodies.

When I arrived at the temple about 6.00 pm on Saturday 2nd May, there was a carnival-like atmosphere with stalls selling an assortment of Indian delicacies, flowers and prayer items. Two men wearing light green reflective jackets were seen directing vehicles to open parking space. A woman was spotted canvassing for donation to a charitable organization.

A long line of about 50 devotees was already forming to offer prayers to Lord Muneesvarar and the queue gets longer by the minutes.

At the barricade erected to separate the wild boars and the visitors, there was already a crowd of about 300 people waiting patiently for the wild boars to turn up from the secondary jungle in the hills. It was a scene of frenzied activity when the first few wild boars appeared and followed later by a bigger herd.
The crowd is seen pushing, shoving and stretching out their hands through the wooden barricade with many either holding pieces of white paper with numbers written on it; or ringgit notes of value RM1, RM5 or RM10 denomination; or lottery tickets such as 4-D/Da Ma Cai/Toto and using them to rub against the wild boars. Some even use bare hands to touch and rub the body. The wild boars seem to enjoy all the attention given to them.

By 7.30 pm it was already dark and the crowd had swelled into more than a thousand people as more wild boars about 40 - 50 of them turned up to be fed after hearing the sounds of the temple bell which is rung every evening. So I guess its dinner time for the wild boars when they hear the temple bell sounds! The temple and barricade area is lighted up with fluorescent lamps.


How It Began:
According to a local resident, the phenomenon started a few years ago when a local Chinese electrician carried out some electrical work at the isolated temple. He stroked the wild boars and won numerous four-digit number prizes. With the prize money he had won and saved, he donated RM5,000 to the temple.
At that time there was hardly any visitor except for those who came to pray at the temple. On hearing this, many local Taiping residents who came to touch the wild boar for good luck also reported to have strike it big. Soon words spread like wild fire with visitors from as far as Thailand and Singapore thronging the temple daily in hundreds and could swell into thousands on weekends and public holidays.

Unpleasant Incidents:A local resident reminded visitors to the temple to behave themselves and respect the sanctity of the holy temple and the wild boars! It is said that the wild boars at the temple belonged to Lord Muneesvarar. So a word of caution is: Do not disturb the wild boars at the temple.

She recalled an incident where a visitor suddenly sprawled on the ground with his four limbs and uttered a high-pitched cry, as if crying, and behaved with characteristic of pigs after beating the wild boar. He uttered strange sounds that nobody could understand. Fortunately he recovered quickly and was back to his normal self standing on his two feet after offering prayer of apology and forgiveness to the temple God.

She also recalled of a man who suddenly became seriously ill and vomited blood after he took home a young wild boar without permission from the temple. Miraculously he recovered with a clean bill of health after returning the animal.


with regards Sara Pandian

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